Free Shipping on all orders

Research Resources


National Center for Biotechnology Information


Seasonal Influenza A Virus in Feces of Hospitalized Adults

Abstract

In a cohort of hospitalized adults with seasonal influenza A in Hong Kong, viral RNA was frequently (47%) detected in stool specimens. Viable virus was rarely isolated. Viral RNA positivity had little correlation with gastrointestinal symptoms and outcomes. In vitro studies suggested low potential for seasonal influenza viruses to cause direct intestinal infections. Keywords: influenza, viruses, seasonal influenza A, gastrointestinal, fecal virus detection, Hong Kong, adults. Read more

 


ResearchGate


Viruses in faeces

Abstract

Enteroviruses, hepatitis A virus, rotaviruses, parvovirus-like viruses, astroviruses, caliciviruses, adenoviruses and coronaviruses can be present in the human excreta. Besides parvovirus-like viruses, other small, rounded viruses can be detected in the fecal samples from patients with acute diarrhoeal disease. These include astroviruses, caliciviruses, and coronaviruses. Viruses may be divided into three main groups: viruses associated with humans, viruses associated with higher plants and animals, and viruses associated with the microbial flora. Excreta is the commonest source for viruses. The consequent dilution of viruses in feces when discharged into the receiving waters or sewage implies that the sample being tested must be concentrated in order to analyze them. The main disinfection processes for the removal of fecal bacteria include chlorination and ozonation. Several factors can explain the viral inactivation in waste stabilization ponds, including solar radiation, temperature, pH, adsorption onto solids, heavy metals, algal and bacterial activity, and the action of certain chemicals-notably ammonia and sulphide. Read more
 


National Center for Biotechnology Information


Viruses in the stools.

Abstract

It has long been possible to isolate viruses from the stools by culture, though the viruses found are rarely implicated in disease of the gut. In contrast, only recently has it been possible to identify viruses in the stools of patients with diarrhoea. Initially, such identifications were made by electron microscopy but the unsuitability of the microscope for large-scale screening has led to the development of other methods. The new methods have concentrated on rotaviruses but other viruses are also implicated and an overall view of the significance of finding a virus in any stool specimen has to take into account the evidence about all viruses, old and new. Read more


European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases


Long term detection of seasonal influenza RNA in faeces and intestine

Abstract

The prospective observational study “Long term detection of seasonal influenza RNA in faeces and intestine” [1] reports findings derived from 22 patients infected with seasonal influenza A (IAV) or influenza B (IBV) viruses. Diarrhoea occurred significantly more often in patients who were faecal IAV positive than those who were faecal IAV negative. The exploration of viral kinetics in two of the 22 included subjects revealed that IAV and IBV RNA were detectable in stools for a further 2 weeks. Virus mRNA and antigens were detected in intestinal tissue from a third subject. Read more


National Center for Biotechnology Information


Lifting the lid on toilet plume aerosol: A literature review with suggestions for future research

Abstract

The potential risks associated with “toilet plume” aerosols produced by flush toilets is a subject of continuing study. This review examines the evidence regarding toilet plume bioaerosol generation and infectious disease transmission. Read more